SaturnFans.com
saturnfans.com - classifieds - forums


Go Back   SaturnFans.com Forums > Models > Saturn S-Series > S-Series Tech

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-27-2010, 11:47 PM   #1
eimajenthat
Junior Member
eimajenthat is on a distinguished road
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 16

1994 SL
Default Remove fuel pump from gas tank

Hello all-

I love these cars. They're really easy to work on, from what I've seen so far. Especially the SOHC, TBI, like I've got. I'm on my second. I bought one earlier this year ('94 SL), with an idling problem, which I managed to fix. Then the clutch went out, and I had to let it go (cost of clutch + labor > value of car). Made me so said, as I had the engine absolutely purring.

But they're really cool cars, so I got another one, also a '94 SL, also SOHC with TBI. I hate buying dead cars, there is always more wrong than you could ever imagine. But these are sweet little cars, and it was $100, so I took the gamble.

So, none of that back story was relevant, except to say that I am a Saturn fan, and I might not be too bright (I guess that depends on how much money I put into it before it runs).

I believe the fuel pump is bad, possibly due to whatever it slurped from the bottom of a 5 year untouched gas tank when I tried to crank it (should have siphoned and cleaned it first, I know). I did the relay test mentioned in the Haynes manual, and it seems to indicate a bad fuel pump, unless I did it wrong, which would surprise me not at all.

So, I put the rear end of the car on jack stands, and after much manhandling, managed to drop the tank. Little did I know, that was the easy part.

I have spent the last several hours trying to remove the (brass?) locking ring which holds the pump onto the tank. I do not believe it has moved even a tenth of a millimeter. Haynes says I just tap it, carefully, with a brass punch and hammer. I tapped it carefully, no movement. I tapped it less carefully, no movement. I beat the ever loving snot out of it, as best I could, lying beneath a car. No movement. I drowned the thing repeatedly in WD-40. You guessed it, the ring stayed put.

As I lay beneath my automobile, contemplating the impervious nature of my gas tank, I observed something somewhat puzzling. The brass ring has 5 points at which it is bonded to the tank. At each of these points, a little metal clip-type thing emerges from the tank and grips the ring. Underneath these clips, the ring has sort of a bump. The clips seemed to be sort of crimped over said bump. Thus, it looks like these clips would have to be uncrimped to remove the ring, and therefore the fuel pump.

Am I missing something? Is it actually possible to remove the fuel pump, or is this whole thing a practical joke at my expense? Maybe, I need someone with bigger, manlier arms to swing the hammer? Is there a special tool that unlocks the great mysterious of the fuel tank?

I will post some pictures of the situation in a little bit, I just wanted to throw this up on the forum, to see if anyone knew the secret handshake, and would be willing to share it.

Thanks!
Jamie
eimajenthat is offline   Reply With Quote
SaturnFans.com Sponsored Links
Old 10-28-2010, 12:12 AM   #2
eimajenthat
Junior Member
eimajenthat is on a distinguished road
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 16

1994 SL
Default Re: Remove fuel pump from gas tank

Snapped some pictures of the ring, pump, and tank. You can see how the black clippy sort of thing is crimped over the bump sort of thing on the brass ring sort of thing. Hope I'm not being too technical here...

I can't officially post URLs yet, so you'll have to copy and paste. Sorry.

img839.imageshack.us/img839/7727/overhead.jpg

img830.imageshack.us/img830/1006/anglev.jpg

img839.imageshack.us/img839/7727/overhead.jpg
eimajenthat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2010, 02:57 PM   #3
fdryer
Super Member
fdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond repute
 
fdryer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NYC
Posts: 45,854
 

2003 L-Series 3.0L Sedan
Default Re: Remove fuel pump from gas tank

Heh-heh, you may be going at it the wrong way.

The plated steel ring grabs and holds onto the plastic tabs while sealing the tank. Most screw-ons are righty-tighty/tighten clockwise, lefty-loosey/loosen counter clockwise. The ring is unscrewed to release. Use the brass punch or large tipped screwdriver to tap against the hook part of this steel lock ring, tapping lefty-loosey/loosening counterclockwise. You're trying to remove the steel ring that needs to go CCW.

The drawing below is from a '98 with the Saturn fuel locking tool. The FSM states; A 1/2 in. breaker bar (approximately 18 inches long) will easily loosen and remove the lock ring.
Attached Images
File Type: gif Fuel tank lock ring remover.gif (26.3 KB, 93 views)
File Type: jpg fuel lock ring.jpg (143.1 KB, 97 views)
...
VCX NANO
fdryer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2010, 12:01 PM   #4
eimajenthat
Junior Member
eimajenthat is on a distinguished road
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 16

1994 SL
Default Re: Remove fuel pump from gas tank

Success! The fuel pump is free! Thanks for the tips, fdryer. I was hitting there, but also other places. Based on your advice, I concentrated my energy on the correct tapping point. Here are a few other things I did that helped:

1) Right tool for the right job. Initially, I was trying to use a hammer and a screwdriver. I got something much more "brass punch"-shaped (the giant locking pin from my hydraulic jack), and that helped. Also, I switched rubber mallet, instead of a hammer. Better transfer of energy, or something like that.

2) Pull the tank all the way out. I was trying to remove the pump with the tank dropped, but still under the car. Stupid stupid stupid. Once I got it out in the open, it was a lot easier to work on. Duh! In my defense, the Haynes manual says to disconnect the fuel pump before you pull the tank out. Of course, they really mean disconnecting the wires and fuel lines, but I did not see how to disconnect the fuel lines at first. FYI, it's about 16 inches down the line from the tank, kind of on the side of the tank.

3) Mind over matter. I found that while I was banging on the tank with mallets and hammers, it was hard to hold it still. So I dragged it out to the street, and braced it against the curb. Much more effective.

3) I don't have a clever name for this one. But those ears you are supposed to hit with the hammer and punch bend pretty easily, until they're flat against the tank. At which point, they're hard to hit. I stuck a flat pry bar underneath the ear, to keep it from bending.

Now the pump is out, I'm going to try and test it a little more thoroughly, and see if I need to replace it or just clean it. Thanks for your help!

Hoping to join the ranks of Saturn drivers (rather than just owners) soon!

Jamie
eimajenthat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2010, 04:13 PM   #5
fdryer
Super Member
fdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond repute
 
fdryer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NYC
Posts: 45,854
 

2003 L-Series 3.0L Sedan
Default Re: Remove fuel pump from gas tank

Way to go! With old cars comes old wiring. Sometimes the wiring may be sketchy so it helps to know the wiring layout. The fuel pump uses a ground wire going to the rear stop lights. A bunch of grounds are all tied together and may be corroded at the connection to the car frame. Be sure when you check this pump that you check it at least twice; out of the tank wired temporarily to 12v and then with the car harness connected.
...
VCX NANO
fdryer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2010, 06:18 PM   #6
eimajenthat
Junior Member
eimajenthat is on a distinguished road
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 16

1994 SL
Default Re: Remove fuel pump from gas tank

I checked it twice straight to 12V DC (wired it to my battery charger), and it does appear to be bad. I'm reasonably sure I didn't fry it with the charger. I had the charger set to 2A, not 6A. Hopefully that was right.

At any rate, I drove all over town, and found both a strainer and a pump, at different parts stores. I put the new pump into the plastic assembly with the fuel sender on the side, connected the lines and set it a bowl of gasoline to test the new one.

My battery is dead. It has a right to be dead, as it did sit for about 5 years without use. I will probably buy a new one once I have the car running. In the mean time, I'm charging the battery up now.

The battery did have enough power to run the ignition and accessories and whatnot, so I did a little testing. According to the Haynes manual, you should be able to hear the fuel pump running for the first couple seconds after you turn the key to the ON position, and don't crank the engine. I do not hear it. Would a mostly dead battery power the dashboard indicator stuff, but fail to run the fuel pump? Or do I have another problem? I see two reasonable possibilities. I could have an electrical problem causing the pump to not receive current, or I could have put the thing back together wrong.

Really, though, the electrics on the pump are pretty simple and foolproof. The only tricky part was positioning it right in that plastic assembly. I'm almost certain I did that wrong.
eimajenthat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2010, 10:43 PM   #7
fdryer
Super Member
fdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond repute
 
fdryer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NYC
Posts: 45,854
 

2003 L-Series 3.0L Sedan
Default Re: Remove fuel pump from gas tank

The moment the ignition went ON the fuel pump is supposed to run for 2-seconds as the pcm (engine computer) commands it to, to pressurize the fuel lines. If you do not hear the faint hum/hiss sound of the fuel pump running then there's more troubleshooitng of the fuel system. The battery did fine as it did power the ignition system which is the entire fuel injection system; pcm, all the sensors, powering all the instrument panel indicators, etc.. More than enough juice to power the pump too.

You can either use this dead battery with the charger on full (6A?) output to try cycling the ignition as many times as needed to listen for the pump. Just wait about 15-seconds between ignition cycles. No sounds from the pump; proceed to the fuel rail's test valve to check for fuel pressure, just in case you can't hear the pump. Remove the plastic cap to reveal the schrader valve (resembling the tire valve), cover loosely with a rag while depressing the valve stem expecting a healthy spray of fuel. Good spray means the pump works. No spray or a dribble means more troubleshooting; pump fuse, pump relay, wiring to pump, pump, and pump ground. You'll hgave to systematically eliminate one item at a time to find the fault, starting with the pump fuse, swapping the pump relay, testing the relay socket pin outs, jumpering the relay socket pins 30 and 87 to send 12v power to the pump, and checking pump ground. All done one step at a time.

The jumper wire inserted in the pump relay socket pns 30 and 87 will send 12v (HOT all the time) to the pump immediately, regardless of ignition switch position. If you get to this point (since you have a known good pump) you'll have to re-check the wiring to the pump as well as the possibility of pump ground being corroded, preventing the pump from running.

Be patient and take your time.
...
VCX NANO
fdryer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2010, 11:59 PM   #8
eimajenthat
Junior Member
eimajenthat is on a distinguished road
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 16

1994 SL
Default Re: Remove fuel pump from gas tank

Thanks for the help frdyer! The fuel is flowing to the front now. It might have been working before, and I'm just dumb. But now it's definitely working. Sort of.

I have fuel pressure in the front, but the fuel is not flowing to the intake. It stops at the fuel injector (it's TBI, there's only one injector, fdryer knows that I'm sure, but for the kids at home...). I know it's getting to the injector, because when I pop the injector off the throttle body, gas sprays everywhere.

So, I started testing the injector. Haynes says resistance should be between 1.0 and 2.0 ohms, and I think I'm getting about 1.2. But it's a little hard to be accurate there. My meter won't zero when I use the 200 ohm range (smallest). If I use any of the higher settings, its 0s, but at the lowest setting, it reads 1.1. That does not inspire me with a great deal of confidence, but it's a cheap meter, and this is its most precise setting. I guess 1.1 and 0 ohms aren't all that different. Anyway, when I probe the injector, I get 2.3. So I figure if I subtract the reading when I short the probes, likely as not, the injector is giving 1.2 ohms. Does that make sense, or is my ignorance of electricity showing?

So, ohms on the injector seem to be within spec. But no gas comes out. Maybe it's clogged from the crap in the old gas that started this adventure? The business end of the injector looks pretty clean, as does the input area with the screens. The screens are also relatively clean-looking. Just for grins, I tried installing the injector without the screens. I figured if it's broken, I can't make it more broken. If it's the screens causing the problem, I'll know pretty quick. Still no spray.

Does it seem likely the injector is bad? Is there any way to clean the inside? Should I just buy a new or re-manufactured one? Is there another test I can do to confirm absolutely the life or death of the injector?

I found a re-manufactured one for $50, plus core, online:
fuelinjectorwhse.com/carinjectors.php?make=Saturn&model=SL&mn=807

Is that my best bet?

If it seems like I'm pinching pennies, I am. I only paid $100 for this car, but with towing, parts, and paperwork, I'm in for about $400 total. While a $50 part to fix it is a good deal, a $50 part that doesn't fix it just adds to the price tag on my yard art. So I'm trying to make the right call, while realizing the inherent uncertainty in this game.
eimajenthat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2010, 05:47 AM   #9
fdryer
Super Member
fdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond repute
 
fdryer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NYC
Posts: 45,854
 

2003 L-Series 3.0L Sedan
Default Re: Remove fuel pump from gas tank

There's nothing wrong with pinching pennies. The key is knowing when to spend the money..................

With the fuel pump able to run you'll have to start from the beginning. Turning on the ignition should have the fuel pump running for 2-seconds. Listen for the faint hum/hiss of the pump running; the pump is on a 2-second timer then shuts off. You can cycle the ignition as many times as you want but must wait at least 15-seconds between cycles. Hearing the pump running tells you the fuel system is operating to pressurize the fuel lines all the way to the injector. The injector has its own fuse and its HOT all the time with the ignition ON; with the ignition ON you can carefully probe the injector wires for 12v (one probe against engine ground). No 12v on the injector would mean either a blown injector fuse or wiring issue. The pcm uses ground as the switching pulse to the injector. Fuses are in the underhood fuse box or inside the car. Check everywhere.
...
VCX NANO
fdryer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2010, 08:50 AM   #10
eimajenthat
Junior Member
eimajenthat is on a distinguished road
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 16

1994 SL
Default Re: Remove fuel pump from gas tank

So glad you said that. I completely forgot about checking the voltage to the injector. Obviously need to do that before I buy another injector.

So I should be able to read 12V on the injector lead without cranking the engine, right? Just ignition on? Should I get a pulse, or steady current?

To understand a little background, is the injector normally open or normally closed? From what I've read about solenoids (which is what the injector basically is, right?), the pulsing current opens and closes the valve. But some types of solenoids are normally open, so the current closes it; while other solenoids are normally closed, so the current opens it. I'm guessing the injector would be normally closed, so you can build fuel pressure by running the pump like I did earlier, but I could be missing something. Am I understanding the principles correctly?
eimajenthat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2010, 09:31 AM   #11
fdryer
Super Member
fdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond repute
 
fdryer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NYC
Posts: 45,854
 

2003 L-Series 3.0L Sedan
Default Re: Remove fuel pump from gas tank

All injectors are coiled wires, the basic electromagnet. Our injectors are powered with 12v when the ignition's on without starting up; the engine computer pulses the ground connection to make the injector open/close the pintle valve. The pintle valve is the only moving part and is normally in home position, shutting off fuel flow. When the pcm pulses the ground signal the injector coil becomes a magnet that pulls open the pintle valve - fuel flows out under pressure. Switched off and a spring closes the pintle valve. The injector coil is switched on and off by the pcm but 12v is sitting on the injector. You should be able to measure the injector wiring (to ground) for the presence of 12v. You can use a "T" pin or needle to puncture the insulation anywhere on the injector wiring.
...
VCX NANO
fdryer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2010, 10:08 AM   #12
RobertGary1
Master Member
RobertGary1 is a name known to allRobertGary1 is a name known to allRobertGary1 is a name known to allRobertGary1 is a name known to allRobertGary1 is a name known to allRobertGary1 is a name known to all
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Sacramento
Posts: 4,354
 

1996 SC2
2006 VUE 3.5L
Default Re: Remove fuel pump from gas tank

Very odd that the ring is hard to remove. I have a ring tool but generally just put a flat head screwdriver under the lip of the ring and pop it up. If a screwdriver isn't right next to you you may even be able to do it with your fingernail but it may draw blood.

-Robert
RobertGary1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2010, 10:19 PM   #13
eimajenthat
Junior Member
eimajenthat is on a distinguished road
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 16

1994 SL
Default Re: Remove fuel pump from gas tank

Robert-

Once I did the things I mentioned above, it was a lot easier to get the ring off. I think I was just being wrongheaded about it before.

Fdryer-

I did the volt tests several times. It pretty consistently read between 11.2 and 11.5. I probed from a few different points, testing both wires with the needle while the injector was connected. I also disconnected the injector, and probed from the positive leads on the connector to ground. All results were roughly similar. The battery didn't have enough power to crank, so I didn't test the pulsing. Neighbors were asleep nearby anyway.

I think the electrical system is good. I guess it's down to the injector. I still don't see any dirt or clogging, but I guess it could be inside, and it probably wouldn't take much to clog something that tiny.

Anything else I should try before I order an injector?
eimajenthat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2010, 10:44 PM   #14
fdryer
Super Member
fdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond repute
 
fdryer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NYC
Posts: 45,854
 

2003 L-Series 3.0L Sedan
Default Re: Remove fuel pump from gas tank

Step back for a few minutes and review things.

You have fuel and pressure at the injector but no injector pulse(s). The injector isn't blown (open coil) or shorted (2.3 ohms), making this injector probably a good one. 12v is on the injector, waiting for the pcm to pulse (ground). So far, everything's good.

What you havn't done was a spark test, requiring a battery to crank the engine over. A spark test will answer why the injector won't pulse as spark and injector pulses are tied to the pcm. No, the pcm isn't suspect as much as what allows the pcm to operate - the crank position sensor (CPS). The cps provides precise timing signals that's crucial to pcm (engine computer) operation; the pulse train (signals) from the cps while the engine rotates allows the pcm to; turn on the fuel pump, initiate the ignition system for spark, and pulse the injector on the throttle body. No cps output = no fuel pump, no ignition for spark, and no injector pulses, a DEAD engine. The typical symptom is the engine can crank over but will never fire up; the cps failed to provide the pcm the timing signals necessary to allow the pcm to operate.

Have a good battery connected and try a spark test; remove the coil wires, after noting firing order, and have someone crank the engine while you observe for spark across the coil towers; no spark means a failed cps while a close second would be the ignition module. More cps' fail than ignition modules.
...
VCX NANO
fdryer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2010, 02:53 PM   #15
eimajenthat
Junior Member
eimajenthat is on a distinguished road
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 16

1994 SL
Default Re: Remove fuel pump from gas tank

I guess I didn't explain that well. I meant I did not do a pulse test, not that I was unable to get pulse. I charged the battery later, and cranked it. I have pulse, and I have spark.

I ordered a re-manufactured fuel injector, and put it in. It still was not starting, so I started looking at other suspects. The first thing I did was check that fuel pressure release valve. It let out some fuel, but didn't have much pressure. So, it seemed I had a new problem on my hands (I definitely had pressure before). While I was troubleshooting the fuel pressure issue, I bypassed the fuel pump relay as before, to see if it was the problem, and to ensure the pump was still pumping. It was, but I left it running too long, while trying to figure out what the problem was. I seem to have burned up the new fuel pump. I wired it directly to 12V, and get no humming motor, pumping noises, so it's definitely quite dead.

Is running the fuel pump too long sufficient to burn it up? It should be running all the time when you're driving, so I wouldn't think so. I had it submerged in fuel, inside its plastic assembly, though not in the tank. It wasn't able to push fuel out of the injector, so I guess the pressure was building, and it was having to push harder. I guess it doesn't like that. I guess there's not safeguard against that, or maybe there is, but works by using the relay that I bypassed.
eimajenthat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2010, 03:30 PM   #16
fdryer
Super Member
fdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond reputefdryer has a reputation beyond repute
 
fdryer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NYC
Posts: 45,854
 

2003 L-Series 3.0L Sedan
Default Re: Remove fuel pump from gas tank

Driving until the fuel tank runs down would mean at least a few hours of constant fuel pump operation so if its exposed when the tank runs down there's a possibility of pump damage but no one has proven so.

Running your fuel pump outside the tank but submerged in fuel may have damaged it but there may be other reasons for this than meets meets the eye. A normally operating fuel pump in a fuel system has two safe guards; a fuel pressure regulator and fuel pump check valve. The regulator is to ensure pressure doesn't exceed the EFI system requirements while the check valve ensures fuel flows in one direction and not flow back into the tank. All this doesn't protect a manually wired pump left on for who knows how long. The last safe guard against a constantly running pump is when the engine stops running; lack of engine rotation would mean the cps stops generating timing signals - these timing signals allows the engine computer to run so the moment the cps stops signal generation, the engine computer stops. The engine computer turns on the pump; no cps signal means no fuel pump operation.
...
VCX NANO
fdryer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2010, 08:50 PM   #17
eimajenthat
Junior Member
eimajenthat is on a distinguished road
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Texas
Posts: 16

1994 SL
Default Re: Remove fuel pump from gas tank

Well, I got another fuel pump, a Carter this time, rather than an Airtex. From my research, they seem to be higher quality. I got everything hooked up, and after a little spluttering, it came to life. She's a running!

Still have a few smaller issues to work out, but I think I'll start a new thread if I need any help. Thanks for all the great advice and information, frdyer!
eimajenthat is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fuel Pump Replacement, 1994 SL2, Post tank lowering. Crasoum S-Series General 7 01-21-2013 05:31 PM
DOHC Fuel Rail - Need remove PS-Pump? TomM96 S-Series Tech 4 01-06-2010 11:16 PM
What does it take to remove the cooling tank? quattro_denver Vue Red Line 2 07-18-2009 04:15 PM
How do you remove fuel pump/sending unit? ringman S-Series Tech 9 02-27-2007 02:49 AM
Lowering fuel tank & replacing pump Question ( 95SL2 ) Luke S-Series Tech 9 05-15-2003 07:50 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:10 PM.

Advanced Forum Search | Advanced Photo Search


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
SaturnFans.com. The Saturn Enthusiasts Site.