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Old 04-28-2021, 01:27 PM   #1
Bituminous
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Default A/C Clutch Wiring Connector

I have a 95 SC2. The A/C stopped working. I checked pressure and voltages at all 4 relay pins and the pressure switch and every thing was normal. Voltage was also getting to the wire into the connector on top of the compressor, but the clutch did not engage. If I jiggle or pull up on the connector (pictured in attachment), the clutch engages and the system blows cold air inside.

Does anyone know where this connector can be purchased without buying a new compressor? Can a universal connector be spliced in, if the exact fit is not available? Would it be advisable to try using a zip tie to tighten the connector instead of replacing it? Should I just try to find one in a scrap yard that still works?

Any advice greatly appreciated.
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Old 04-28-2021, 03:02 PM   #2
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Default Re: A/C Clutch Wiring Connector

There are several ways to repair this connection: cut the connector off and use a wire nut to bind the two stripped wires together (in the eventuality of replacing the compressor), butt connect the two wires together after cutting off the connector, disconnect the connector and examine both carefully for breaks in the crimped terminals or fraying at the crimped terminals for repairs, finding the same connector from junk yards to replace this faulty connector, etc. Apparently from your troubleshooting, the compressor runs when wiggling the connector. It would be great if you find corrosion on either male or female terminals for cleaning to renew the connector. If this is what you find and not frayed wiring or damaged crimped wires then after cleaning the corroded terminals, apply some dielectric grease, petroleum jelly or plain grease on terminals for a protectant against future corrosion since its exposed to airflow thru the radiator.
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Old 04-29-2021, 01:55 PM   #3
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Default Re: A/C Clutch Wiring Connector

This. Done. lol
https://www.amazon.com/MOTOALL-Conne.../dp/B07JFZH4D3
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Old 05-01-2021, 03:25 PM   #4
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Default Re: A/C Clutch Wiring Connector

Thanks for the replies.

Despite its appearance, it's actually a one-wire connector, with a hollow port. For now, I bypassed it with a butt connector. With voltage now going to the A/C clutch, I have the following static and dynamic pressures:

Static: High 54, Low 51
Dynamic: High 62, low 46

Ambient temp is about 62

Would this indicate that the compressor is not compressing, or is further diagnosis needed to rule out the expansion valve?
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Old 05-01-2021, 03:31 PM   #5
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Default Re: A/C Clutch Wiring Connector

It's actually a 2-wire connector with 1 plugged off; you repair it with the 2 wire connector and pop out the pin you don't need. If you want it to look its best when you're done, use a tool like this.



The way it looks in the picture the 1 pin used on either side aren't the ones that are connecting to each other. That's likely the real issue.
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Old 05-01-2021, 06:03 PM   #6
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Default Re: A/C Clutch Wiring Connector

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bituminous View Post
..... With voltage now going to the A/C clutch, I have the following static and dynamic pressures:

Static: High 54, Low 51
Dynamic: High 62, low 46

Ambient temp is about 62

Would this indicate that the compressor is not compressing, or is further diagnosis needed to rule out the expansion valve?
Compressors don't fail by themselves. Lack of refrigerant is the main reason for misinterpreting compressor failure. The txv, along with the compressor only work when sufficient refrigerant allows both to operate. No refrigerant or more than 1/2 system loss of refrigerant results in both unable to operate. They just run less efficiently. Every ac system relies on a sealed system with 100% refrigerant. A leak is the most likely reason for lower operating pressures and misinterpreting compressor and/or txv faults.

There may be one member replacing the txv but replaced compressor, condenser coil and drier. This doesn't prove a faulty txv and no one has ever proven a txv failure. What you didn't mention were operating pressures in opening post but did have cold air. Since then, bypassing the connector and now posting pressures, I believe the connector wasn't the problem but something many unfamiliar with vehicle ac systems when problems occur. Briefly put, your system leaked refrigerant over time, triggers the pressure sensor detecting lower high side pressures and sends a signal to the pcm to disable power to the compressor.

You may have been swayed by the connector with power on it but may not have the overall picture of the pressure sensor detecting lost refrigerant right on the borderline between enough to run but lost enough to trigger the pressure sensor signaling the pcm to disable power. The pressure sensor is there to protect the compressor from operating without enough refrigerant as refrigerant carries lubricating oil throughout the system as a mist. Without enough refrigerant, less oil returns to lube the compressor. No lube can result in compressor self destruction. The pressure sensor prevents the compressor from self destruction.

Are you sure the second set of pressures are with the compressor actually running? The entire clutch plate is visible, some have three metal strips with unusual buttons - they are the flexible pieces to allow clutch plate movement of about 0.015 inch (air gap) away or towards the pulley face for engagement. With engine idling, ac off, the clutch plate remains still while the ac pulley continues to turn. With ac on (enough refrigerant to run) the clutch plate engages with a metallic click many hear as the clutch plate turns with the pulley. When the clutch plate is seen spinning at the same speed as the ac pulley, pressures should settle with distinctive values; low side between 25-35 psi, high side between 150-250 psi. Engine rpm should be @2k rpm for the S-series, not idle. No one drives at idle speed and 2k rpm is the average driving rpm for measuring ac pressures. If you measure at idle, pressures may not be correct and misleading against 2k recommended rpm from service manuals.

If the compressor is running (clutch plate spinning as rpm is varied) then the second set of values indicates lost refrigerant from a leak. 98% of all vehicle ac system failures are from leaks. An inexpensive uv blacklight can find leaks as all GM systems have dye. Invisible refrigerant leaks out but clear lubricating oil and dye marks leak sites for easy illumination by uv light at dusk, night or inside a dark garage. Yellow green dye is fluorescent. If the clutch isn't spinning, this means the pressure sensor detected too much refrigerant lost from the leak and sent a disable signal to the pcm to disable power to the compressor clutch coil.
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Old 05-01-2021, 08:30 PM   #7
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Default Re: A/C Clutch Wiring Connector

Fdryer,

Thanks very much for this. I should clarify the sequence of events.

The a/c had worked last year through the summer and fall but felt a little weak, and the defogger worked in winter. About a week ago was when I noticed no change in engine sound when pressing the A/C button, and verified that the compressor clutch was not engaging.

The static pressure was around 33 psi at the time, and I had 12V going to the pressure switch, but only about 0.25 V coming out. Adding just a little R134a w/ dye was enough to raise the static pressure to almost 40 psi, which produced 12V between the yellow wire on the backside of the switch and ground. I added a little more until the pressure was around 50 psi, which I thought was around normal for an ambient temp of about 80F. Still, the clutch wasn't engaging, so I tested the four pins of the relay, and found everything normal.

At this time, I was going to disconnect the connector on top of the compressor and check for voltage, but as soon as I touched it, the clutch clicked and the inside part of the pulley started spinning. As soon as I took my hand off the connector, it disengaged, so I bypassed the connector.

This brings us to the current pressure readings, which I obtained at idle. Tomorrow it should be a little warmer, and I will open the throttle body a little by hand to raise the RPM while I watch the gauges. I don't have a UV light for the dye, but maybe one of the parts stores has one available for loan. The leak seems to be quite slow and I'm not sure I would see much yet.
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Old 05-01-2021, 09:18 PM   #8
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Default Re: A/C Clutch Wiring Connector

With so much info given, I neglected to include some more. Approximately 40 psi is the target pressure when the pressure sensor determines too little refrigerant left (very little lubrication) in the system to trigger the disable signal sent to the pcm. Pressure sensors are mechanical and not precise (+ or minus a few psi). With more info, you described a typical leak since you refilled the system that already leaked, enough to provide cooling for a season, last year. A leak continues whether the system is running or not. Buy and use an inexpensive uv blacklight to find the source of the leak. Examples of dye are in both service valves. When you topped off/refilled the system and disconnected the refill can, did you see dye? Leaks can be worn service valves with loose caps, compressor front shaft seal, fittings, crimped fittings, break in hose, condenser coil damage, etc. A uv light shined over the entire system will show where the leak(s) are. Normal wear and tear from driving rattles ac plumbing made of soft aluminum trying to restrain up to 450 psi, the safety blow off pressure at the compressor to prevent hoses from exploding if incorrect servicing is performed like overcharging or using other refrigerant as a substitute. Every refrigerant used in home, portable, central, business systems are formulated for best performance. This also means different operating pressures and volume.

At this point, you're refilling a leaking system so its your choice to continue refilling or attempt to find the source of the leak then decide if you can make repairs and complete it by using a vacuum pump, check for any more vacuum leaks before refilling with 1.5lbs of r134a. If you decide to attempt repairs, you become the ac specialist. The alternative would be saving money by repairing the system then having a shop perform the evacuation and refill. Whether a shop will test for any leaks is up to them to inform you as they prefer to do all the repairs to reap the most profit. The most money spent would be a repair shop performing what I described, marking up any parts needed, hourly labor rates plus a percentage for overhead costs and profit - several hundred dollars.

When you raise rpm above 1200 and don't see the high side pressures increase above 125 psi, your system leaked out most of the 1/5 lbs of refrigerant. A guess is less than 8 ounces remains in the system, far below the 1.5 lbs needed.
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Old 05-02-2021, 11:05 AM   #9
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Default Re: A/C Clutch Wiring Connector

Thanks again.

I should point out that I didn't refill the system last year, just noticed it seemed a little weaker than before.

The first time I added any R134a was last week was when I noticed the compressor not engaging, and I only filled it enough to trigger the pressure switch.

This morning, I added more R134a w/dye. Now the system is running and blowing quite cool, not quite cold. The readings I get now are:

Idle: 70/45
~2000 RPM: 95/30

I presume I am still a bit low on R134A, but I think the pressures are high enough now that the leak will be more obvious. Tuesday I should be able to look for a UV light. I did a visual inspection of the condenser, lines, and TXV. The only place I noticed any moisture and hissing was the high side schrader port. Connecting and disconnecting my gauge made the hissing stop. If the schrader is sticking, can it be replaced like a valve stem core after evacuating the system, or does the whole line need to come off?
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Old 05-02-2021, 12:30 PM   #10
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Default Re: A/C Clutch Wiring Connector

Whether or not refilling/topping off a system and noticing cooling was less than expected, you're already on the "I'll just put some in since its sold everywhere" while denying or ignoring the obvious. After years of reliable ac, its not as good as it was means the system that was sealed is now leaking. Ac systems are sealed. Your refrigerator is sealed and uses the same r134a but you'll hardly find diyers fixing broken ones. Both require refrigeration knowledge for proper repairs. Investing in gauges is only one step towards understanding refrigeration as you observe operating pressures. Simply varying engine rpm will show gauge pressures fluctuate because refrigerant reacts to compressor speed. Your system leaked out whether from worn service valves or damage elsewhere from wear and tear.

95 psi@2k rpm indicates lost refrigerant, not compressor fault. In normal circumstances, compressors can't compress if there's no air to compress. Choke the inlet to a compressor and see what happens. Lose refrigerant and a compressor can't compress what's not there. Assuming adding some refrigerant with dye can help find leaks is avoiding what's already occurred - the leak is continuous and doesn't stop so leaks leave dye markers for anyone with a uv light to find the leak. Slow leaks won't make any sounds. Soapy water is another way to find leaks. There should be plenty of dye (visible) around the high side service valve along with oil.

Valve stems are replaceable. AutoZone may have a valve core removal tool for loan out to replace valve stems without releasing remaining refrigerant. The cheapest is around $20 to buy a set. Low and high side vehicle ac quick couplers are sized differently to reduce chances of mistakes connecting gauges incorrectly/opening gauge valves and introducing high pressure into disposable 12 oz cans. Pressures above 30 psi can be hazardous. 175 psi can explode a refill can mistakenly connected to the high side by anyone unfamiliar with handling refrigeration gauges. Pros use tools so expensive refrigerant isn't released into the atmosphere. The alternative is removing remaining refrigerant into reclamation canisters (legally complying with epa regulations) with a vacuum pump then opening a system to make repairs. The epa (police?) cannot fine anyone if their vehicle crashed and visible evidence of a trashed ac system resulted in a catastrophic release of r134a or when most systems develop a leak from normal wear and tear, releasing r134a slowly. Dealers, repair shops and anyone repairing ac systems are required to have reclamation canisters to store refrigerant removed from systems prior to repairs. Businesses have high turnovers. Diyers have zero and can't justify expensive equipment for one repair. Slow leaks occur. Not every diyer has all the equipment for refrigeration repairs.
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