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Old 08-01-2022, 04:18 PM   #25
fdryer
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Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NYC
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2003 L-Series 3.0L Sedan
Default Re: 2002 Saturn SL-2 Air Conditioning Not Working

In theory, it's recommended to follow service manual procedures; replace compressor oil with the amount poured out from the old compressor and pour oil into new dryer. This allows oil replenishment in new parts so the system is balanced upon startup. If you pour oil only into the compressor, any discharged oil simply goes into the condenser coils and the bulk remain there unless forced to enter the dryer. R134a condenser coils are parallel design where pressurized refrigerant flows from one side thru parallel coils to the other side. Oil will coat every interior surface of the finned tubing. Whatever drains out may or may not enter the dryer as either a mist or fluid. Whatever oil is retained may or may not enter the line to the evaporator coil/txv. Pouring oil into the dryer will help oil get to the evaporator coils to eventually return to the compressor.

There are no guarantees when diy repairs are made but following service manual guidelines helps prevent unintended consequences that may occur if not following procedures. As always, it's your choice. As mentioned previously, replacing the txv can be troublesome.

Last edited by fdryer; 08-01-2022 at 04:31 PM.
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