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Old 05-09-2021, 03:07 PM   #13
fdryer
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Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NYC
Posts: 45,058
 

2003 L-Series 3.0L Sedan
Default Re: Just died 5 times at stop lights...

Quote:
Originally Posted by toggenburg View Post
I just went through a weird troubleshooting experience with a 26hp Kawasaki riding mower. Similar dying issue (obviously quite different than a Saturn S), and pursued similar thoughts of coils/wire set, plugs, air, fuel. Only to finally determine that the fuel was [I]stale [I] and had to replenish with fresh fuel. This solved my mower issue; from dying every few minutes to mowing perfectly for 3+ hours straight, however; it may have zero bearing on your car dying issue.
I bought a small (unknown hp) single stage snow blower a few years ago. At the end of snow season I add an ounce of fuel conditioner to remaining fuel then drain it from the carb and tank. Pulling the starter rope to get the engine to start or not allows this mixture to work its way into the carb and engine for storage until the next snow season. This seems to work every year when fresh fuel is poured in for the first startup. One pull. I hope this still works after a few more seasons pass.

Do you drain fuel at the end of the season or leave it without pouring in a fuel treatment then running the engine for a minute after treatment? I find it difficult to believe the same gasoline used in vehicles goes stale in lawn mowers, riding mowers, and other small engines but I accept anyone determining their gas went stale hence the fuel treatment products to keep fuel stabilized. My guess is a shed with several gas driven products may be a pain to drain all fuel for several months of non use if a fuel conditioner is poured in to help fuel from going stale. Another issue not covered may be fuel turning to varnish and clogging carburetor passages with fresh fuel dissolving this coating. Whether carburetor with float valve or diaphragm pump for two stroke engines, gasoline may form varnish to choke small passages into the equivalent of passageway arteriosclerosis - buildup choking fuel flow. Small gas engines may be more prone to their small passageways building up clogs than car engines left as lawn ornaments for a year or more with zero startup issues.
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