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Old 11-06-2021, 07:33 AM   #21
fdryer
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Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NYC
Posts: 45,566
 

2003 L-Series 3.0L Sedan
Default Re: '09 Aura No Crank, No Click, No Start

2003 was a long time ago but i remember when I used my Verizon cellphone, I called a relative to warn her that NYC trains were dead as news spread in the afternoon during my 'field repairs' when I heard a car radio blasting of the Northeast blackout while I was finishing up starter replacement. Cellphone towers not using Verizon were dead in NYC. This included landlines because I couldn't call another relative, cell tower to landmine. Verizon's cellphone tower to its dedicated copper wired landlines were not affected but all other cellphone towers were dead, including their landlines using cable systems because these 'landlines' were powered by the electrical grid. The electrical grid was dead so non Verizon landlines were dead.

Verizon is Bell telephone, NY Telephone, Western Electric. The oldest phone company before the breakup of the monopoly. This is the oldest dedicated phone system using dedicated wires strictly for telephones. Maintaining this may have been part legacy issue and insurance against the very real power outage when Ma Bell kept their phone system separate from the electric utilities across the country. This also meant keeping standby generators in case of a local power outage so people can still make calls on landlines. Carrying this legacy over to cellphones and towers, Verizon kept this system. All other cellphones relied on the electric companies for uninterrupted power. The northeast blackout of '03 brought out deficiencies in cellphone systems from relying on local electric power. Local news reported people couldn't use their cellphones. Verizon was the only company to maintain their old landlines along with backup power to their cell towers. All others were dead because they relied on utility power, the power that dropped out throughout the northeast region and parts of Canada. Since non Verizon landlines relied on cable systems, once power died these cable system phones died.

If this was a rude awakening of cellphone companies other than Verizon during this blackout then perhaps rethinking system wide backup power was in order. I believe this occurred behind closed doors as phone providers using cable for quasi landline operation relies on utility power. Cell towers would require backup power if main power was interrupted. If every cellphone provider did this back in '03 then only cellphones can communicate to other cellphones but lose landline connections still needing utility power to operate cable systems providing computerized landlines for phones. This wasn't the case in 2003. A rude awakening to rethink phone systems that are still reliant on local power since landlines don't exist for non Verizon phone lines. Cable systems are the landline for virtually everyone not using Verizon phones with a dedicated separate landline not relying on cable systems. Since cable systems to homes are using local power, I don't know if cable companies have backup power.
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