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Old 06-04-2018, 09:22 PM   #2
fdryer
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Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NYC
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2003 L-Series 3.0L Sedan
Default Re: 2007 Aura XR (3.6L) - AC Not blowing cold air

My guess is you can try any repair shop, even ASE certified mvac techs to find a better and much lower estimate of repairs but I'm suspecting it will be difficult to find the 'pro' that will tell you honestly what failed and details on costs to restore ac back to factory condition. I even doubt if you can find an ASE certified vehicle ac tech.

If the ac fuse isn't blown, your system more than likely suffered a leak somewhere and the main reason for loss of cooling. No refrigerant, no cooling. And please don't reach for refill kits with sealer as you're almost guaranteed to drive up repair costs for using sealer. There may be other problems too but without some diy troubleshooting, guessing can be as costly as your first estimate. I can suggest the most inexpensive home diagnosis to determine where yours failed before determining costs for repairs.

As a diyer, I recommend the lowest cost repairs that starts with at home diagnosing and troubleshooting. The best tool for determining why your ac failed are some time spent checking the easy things and buying an inexpensive uv blacklight. All GM ac systems have dye at factory installation to allow dealers, repair shops and diyers the easiest and fastest way to find 98% of ac failures, the leak no one wants to spend time looking for but will run to the store for the refill kit to repair.........a leaking system. A uv light will illuminate fluorescent dye, greenish yellow. Invisible refrigerant gas disappears where a leak from damage, wear and tear of soft aluminum. Refrigerant oil and dye leave markers for easy uv light detection. Remove one or both service caps for examples of oil and dye. If you are lucky, maybe the schrader valves are worn and leaking and need replacing to help with repairs. Replacing valve stems, evacuating and recharging is the lowest cost repair. This repair can be beaten if a blown fuse is found. There are more unscrupulous repair shops taking advantage of almost every car owner with ac problems.

Buy and use an inexpensive uv light and shine it on every ac part, line, condenser coil, compressor, to find the (sometimes) elusive leak. If you find dye and where it leaks out, costs for repairs can be determined whether you repair yours at home or pay someone. Repairs are always negotiable and the more you know, the better the chances of controlling repair costs. A uv light is the most cost effective way to control costs related to ac problems.

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