Thread: HID option
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Old 02-17-2017, 05:01 PM   #7
fdryer
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Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NYC
Posts: 39,173
 

2003 L-Series 3.0L Sedan
Default Re: HID option

I'm not completely familiar with Outlooks and going by info found. Halogen lamps are what I found, including procedures in the link I posted. However, if yours are hid lamps, are they the ones shown? GM hid lamps, at least one type, have the lamp and ballast as a one piece plug n' play unit. The ballast, shown in the previous reply, is the silver metal box behind the long glass lamp. I don't know if GM makes other types of hid's in other configurations. You'll have to examine your lamps and determine if wiring is an issue. As it is, whether halogen or hid lights, they have a finite life and don't last forever. If it's not wiring, the lamps are probably worn out. To be sure it isn't wiring, you'll have to manually turn on headlights, disconnect each light and measure the connections for 12v power; access to wiring diagrams are either provided here from members, http://workshop-manuals.com (free) or subscribing to alldata or Mitchell for service manuals.

As to searching for replacement parts, GM is not the only source as they're likely to pad a bill as part of "It's nothing personal, it's all business" since every dealer has higher overhead costs compared to shopping online for the same part or equivalent aftermarket replacement. In addition to GM online, rockauto and other auto parts distributors are competitively priced to either match or beat dealer retail prices. Your choice.

Converting from one type of lighting to another may present issues. In general, halogen lighting uses either reflector (you can see the lamps) or projector light housings. You cannot see lamps in projector light housings and light housings are smaller in diameter than reflector light housings due to the intense light output and custom designed optics to throw light farther without blinding opposing traffic. A metal cutoff plate inside low beam projector housings cutoff the upper beam that simply blinds everyone without this cutoff plate - it would simply be a high beam. Other considerations may be with whether or not low beams are used as daytime running lights (DRL's), using a resistor or wired in series for drl use but revert to parallel wiring for night time lighting. GM has several methods and each one is uniquely wired differently. Conversions are either easy or difficult. At the least, hid lights cannot be used in reflector light housings because housings lack the cutoff plate and create a high beam light to blind everyone. Ignorance of these facts resulted in many poorly retrofitted low beam lights blinding opposing traffic. The serious diyer already knows this and buys projector light housings, cracks open the stock housings and custom fits projectors for hid lights. Most, if not all, aftermarket hid lights have a separate ballast box mounted somewhere nearby.

You would be wise to verify which lights are used by accessing your headlights and determine whether or not yours is halogen or hid.

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