Thread: E15
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Old 04-03-2019, 12:20 PM   #6
fdryer
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Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NYC
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2003 L-Series 3.0L Sedan
Default Re: E15

If I'm not mistaken, winter gasoline is formulated to lower vapor pressure in cold temperatures for easier combustion. The change from summer to winter gasoline occurs to all 48 states with 14 states using lower RVP gasoline; https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a1...ine-explained/ (one of several informative sites). Going back to base reference of non leaded 100% 87 octane gasoline, fuel mileage for a specific vehicle drops when 10% ethanol is added, drops some more when an additional 5% is added and finally, drops again when switching from summer to winter gasoline. To appreciate fuel mileage for each change would require the same vehicle be driven over the same roads using a full tank and driven by the same driver, repeated in summer then winter conditions. Temperatures, road conditions, traffic and weather influence fuel mileage as well as how hard or soft the right foot applies throttle.

The sealed cooling systems does not mean car owners are prevented from changing antifreeze. Sealed cooling systems means a better designed and more efficient cooling system not venting to the atmosphere by using a plastic radiator cap on the coolant container with the coolant container pressurized as part of the cooling system. The small air volume allows expansion and contraction of coolant without venting at operating pressures. This stops coolant from oxidizing while allowing longer life time use before replacement. The plastic coolant cap is the radiator cap with a pressure and vacuum valve built in. When overheating occurs and pressures exceed rated values, the pressure valve opens to release excess pressures (above 15 or 20 psi). When hot coolant cools down, a vacuum may occur. The vacuum valve opens to allow atmospheric pressure in. This prevents hoses, radiators and heater cores from collapsing. Under normal every day driving conditions with a car in good condition, cooling systems remain sealed - neither over pressurizing nor creating a vacuum hence the term sealed cooling system.

Anyone can replace their antifreeze any time. Radiators still have a drain valve while the coolant container cap is left off. Pulling the lower radiator hose is still the alternative to the radiator petcock.

Last edited by fdryer; 04-03-2019 at 12:25 PM.
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