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Old 05-19-2013, 05:42 PM   #4
fdryer
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Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NYC
Posts: 40,838
 

2003 L-Series 3.0L Sedan
Default Re: 2002 L300 Many Problems

The txv resides in the firewall cut out where the two a/c hoses connect. The compressor is just that, a device to suction gas from the cabin evaporator coils and compress it to high pressure, discharging it into the condenser coils to cool off and change to a liquid under pressure. There's a high pressure relief valve attached to allow blowing off extreme high pressure above 525 psi - hazardous at this high pressure. An electric clutch coil, clutch plate and large idler bearing/pulley makes up a compressor assembly.

If you live in a/c regions of almost year 'round use then the blower fan may be wearing out. If you leave the fan speed on one medium setting, does fan speed slow down after awhile? This may be a clue to either a fan problem or something else.

The txv regulates cooling to stay above freezing and specs say they're set to about 35F so freezing never occurs. The majority of all lost cooling always results in warmer outlet temps due to loss of refrigerant. R12 systems losing refrigerant tended to develop freezing conditions by the nature of its ability to run and make every freezer in the world operate. R12 car systems didn't worry about the environment and needed the most rudimentary mechanism to regulate cold temps. The mechanisms used are what controls the temperatures and no one wants an ice box blocking air flow. Ice cold air but not ice blocking off air flow. The txv removes the icing tendency but not a failing blower motor. A slow moving blower moves less air and may feel like ice cold air until more air flows through the HVAC box.

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