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Old 02-26-2018, 10:49 PM   #9
fdryer
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Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NYC
Posts: 45,658
 

2003 L-Series 3.0L Sedan
Default Re: 05 Ion Won't Start (Click but no crank)

Whoa there kohly, where did I state your starter is faulty? You haven't posted any background info and I merely state the list of possibilities that must be considered before a starter is deemed the failure. I can assure you that a starter is the last part I would recommend anyone to replace until all other areas are completely exhausted to be free of problems before suggesting the starter is faulty. If you read my post again, I lay out all possibilities to troubleshoot by anyone willing to spend time troubleshooting at home with nothing more than a screwdriver and test light. There are specific steps in troubleshooting (a)electronics, (b)electrical and (c) power before a starter is determined the failure. By replacing the battery, you're left with the rest to troubleshoot. One way to short cut everything, if you're not hesitant and don't mind crawling under the car to access the starter for testing or using a remote start switch - shorting the battery cable terminal to the small terminal on the starter with a screwdriver. This bypasses everything and sends battery power to the starter solenoid to operate the starter immediately. This presumes ignition is OFF, automatic in Park and e-brake pulled. A remote start switch with a long pair of wires with alligator clips can be attached to the same terminals and remotely powering the starter does the same thing, power the starter. Since you say the starter only works when temps are warmer and doesn't in cold, testing should be done in cold. If the starter doesn't power up to crank the engine, replace the starter. Even if the starter does power up there are factors that affect how starters wear out; mileage, number of starts in a day, frequent short trips.

If you want a complete list of testing procedures to find the problem in a, b, or c, I can post procedures. Car electrical and electronic systems aren't difficult to understand when familiar with them. You posted the parts replaced as part of a recall about the ignition switch issues, not about normal wear and tear to any car. Your descriptions seem to be about normal wear and tear. Finding the problem can be done at home or paying GM or repair shop. Your choice.

One last fact with starters failing; the S-series members have repeatedly posted of their starters working fine in warm weather then fail to work in cold temps. Replacing it solved their problems. All threads are about original starters since starters fail between 50k and 300k miles.

Last edited by fdryer; 02-26-2018 at 10:57 PM.
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