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Old 08-13-2008, 04:09 AM   #4
fdryer
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Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NYC
Posts: 43,515
 

2003 L-Series 3.0L Sedan
Default Re: Replace PCM in 2000 L-series wagon

Ahh, a flood car. I understand now. This may present a special problem in connections EVERYWHERE. Where ever flood water (and all it implies) touched, it most likely corroded connections whether visible or not. With care and lots of time it may be a project to go through every wiring connection methodically to expose every terminal as much as possible to ensure that any electrical connection wasn't subject to the corrosive effect that flood water will have on every part of a car. All the ground connections included. All the fuse boxes too. The multiple terminals on the ECM, BCM, and TCM should be visually checked, male and female terminals for any signs of corrosion. There are magic fluids available for helping remove corrosion as well as neutralizing ongoing corrosion. Marine products in spray form work this way to enhance good electrical connections. Just Google anti-corrosive or other key words to find the product. Using a fine brass bristle toothbrush from Home Depot helps to scrape and polish terminals. Hopefully you'll find the little nooks and crannies that corrosion tries to kill the signals needed for the EFI system to work right.

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