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Old 08-12-2017, 03:54 PM   #4
fdryer
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Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NYC
Posts: 39,187
 

2003 L-Series 3.0L Sedan
Default Re: Just Wont Start WIth New Battery

I'm not familiar with Redlines and whether or not it has a conventional or electronic starting circuit. Conventional starting is the ignition switch supplying 12v to the starter solenoid. The auto companies have slowly changed over to electronic starting where logic (low voltage) signals from the ignition switch is sent to the engine computer and a command signal is sent to a relay to switch 12v power, sending 12v to the starter solenoid. Electronic starting complicates the starting circuit. And before assessing which starting circuit you have, what's mileage? This tends to give a perspective on wear and tear of starters.

Starter life can last anywhere from 50k-250k+ miles, depending on how many times it's used per day. There are zero bench tests for starters despite some claiming store tests are valid. Starters haven't changed and still use a starter solenoid, large set of electrical contacts, and brushes for the starter motor. Solenoid, electrical contacts within and brushes are wear items. The only way to find out about starter wear or failure is to disassemble it to examine for worn or broken parts.

The best way to determine a faulty starter; get under the car and measure for 12v on the small gauge (purple?) wire attached to the starter. This will be the single wire on its own small terminal on the starter solenoid. It will have 12 volts on it when the ignition key is held in START position. For safety, disconnecting this wire and measuring it will prevent the starter from powering up. As long as the ignition switch is held in START position, 12v should be on this wire. This verifies the starting circuit only. Cycling the ignition switch, starting, releasing, starting, should show 12v on and off. If the starting circuit operates correctly with 12v on this wire, replace the starter. If 12v isn't measured on this wire, the starting circuit is faulty.

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