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View Full Version : Paint shop prep dos and donts?


adam2887
02-10-2009, 12:44 PM
My Saturn is looking a little beaten up. I was wondering if anyone had some tips on what to do before i take it to a paint shop that might 1. decrease the price, or 2. speed up the time it would take for the paint job.

i know it mostly depends on where you take it but i thought i would ask you guys who know much more than i do.

-body work- I am guessing is it a good idea to do this myself filling/popping dents, debadgeing etc. do most paint shops do this sort of thing already?

-sand prep- sand the car down and have it ready for a primer coat. or would this be counterproductive because on the way over dirt and grime will just hide in all the tiny sanding grooves?

-primer coat- say for some reason you have like 5 rattlecans of car primer just laying around, would that kind of primer be enough before laying the real paint on top? or would they just laugh at you when you left, sand down, and put a real primer on?


anyways, thatís just me thinking out loud. one of these days i may just try my hand at painting it, i have everything i need out there in the garage, except experience and skills :D

OnDaGround
02-10-2009, 12:51 PM
I would give them a call and find out. You may do all that work and it still be the same price.... you know what I mean.

Gerry Proctor
02-10-2009, 01:05 PM
-body work- I am guessing is it a good idea to do this myself filling/popping dents, debadgeing etc. do most paint shops do this sort of thing already?

Only if you're paying them to do that.

-sand prep- sand the car down and have it ready for a primer coat. or would this be counterproductive because on the way over dirt and grime will just hide in all the tiny sanding grooves?

Only if you know what you're doing. If you don't then you will undoubtedly drive up the cost with them trying to get the waxes, grease, and silicones out that you ground into the surface. The more work you can take care of before the paint job, the more money you'll save. But if you don't know what you're doing, it will pooch the paint job. If you want to go this route, I suggest you get some books on car painting and get a thorough understanding of how to do it.

-primer coat- say for some reason you have like 5 rattlecans of car primer just laying around, would that kind of primer be enough before laying the real paint on top? or would they just laugh at you when you left, sand down, and put a real primer on?

Painters use single product lines (like all PPG or all DuPont) to avoid chemical collisions that can compromise a paint job. You could spray on your rattle can primer and demand they paint over your surface to save money, but surface prep is the most important part of a paint job and I'm sure they'll not guarantee any outcomes.


anyways, thatís just me thinking out loud. one of these days i may just try my hand at painting it, i have everything i need out there in the garage, except experience and skills :D

Again, books (and teaching aids like Paintucation) will give you enough background to be able to pull this off. It's probably not beyond you if you're willing to give it a go.

adam2887
02-10-2009, 04:32 PM
Only if you know what you're doing. If you don't then you will undoubtedly drive up the cost with them trying to get the waxes, grease, and silicones out that you ground into the surface.

yes sir, CELAN seems to be top dog. what i mean is if we do the cleanup right, then sand, how much of a drive to a paint shop takes all that hard work and throws it out the window by the drive cramming dirt and grime back onto your nice preped car?

cloud819
02-10-2009, 07:17 PM
Some shops won't touch cars that have had prep work done to them. Call around first.

Next is it worth it? 1996 SL is probably not worth worrying about. If you want a better painted car then I'd say paint it yourself (lot of options there), sell it and buy a car with better paint or just not worry about your current car's paint issues.

Anything more than a Maaco respray is going to be a bit expensive fastly approaching the value of the car.

IYAAYAS
02-11-2009, 07:45 AM
Don't use the spray cans on your car. It's not a good idea to topcoat an air dried alkd primer (oxidation based curing) with a two component topcoat (chemical based curing) that any good body shop should be using. You could run into intercoat adhesion issues between the coats and a paint job that is not as durable as it could be.

In terms of coating performance, chemical resistance, gloss retention, and color stability a two component acrylic or polyester urethane will always be the way to go.

I would let the shop handle it.