Original Saturn Pricing Principles

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The price for each Saturn vehicle was determined by the independent decisions of three stakeholders: Saturn Corporation, the Retailer, and the Customer.

1. Saturn's Decision: The Suggested Retail Price

Like all manufacturers, Saturn suggested a retail price for each vehicle. This was the MSRP (Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price) shown on the window sticker of every new Saturn.

The Saturn Difference: Saturn stood behind its MSRP enthusiastically, because the Saturn MSRP represented real value for the dollar. By keeping its cost structure lean and its quality high, Saturn could offer a MSRP that provides both outstanding value for the Customer and a fair profit for the Retailer.

2. The Retailer's Decision: The Retail Price

Like all car dealers, each Saturn Retailer, acting individually, decided the price at which it would sell a Saturn vehicle to a retail Customer. Saturn strongly encouraged every Retailer to sell at Saturn's MSRP. But each Retailer decided this for itself and was free to sell at MSRP or at a price higher or lower than MSRP.

The Saturn Difference - No Hassle/No Haggle: "No Hassle" meant Saturn Retailers were up-front about all elements of a vehicle's price. No last minute add-ons or hidden charges. Nothing up their sleeves. "No Haggle" meant the Retailer would stick to whatever price it sets. Horse trading and
dickering didn't fit with the Saturn Philosophy. No Customer should ever wonder whether the Retailer's next Customer will get a better price by "driving a harder bargain."

3. The Customer's Decision: To Buy or Not To Buy

Like all Customers, Saturn Customers had the final say: some will buy, some won't.

The Saturn Difference: Naturally, Saturn hoped people saw the quality and value of their vehicles. But everyone - even those who decide not to buy - would know they'd been treated with integrity and respect by Saturn and its Retailers.

Source: Saturn

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