GM Indicates it Will Increase Ad Spending to Boost Awareness of Saturn Models

Automotive News reports that Troy Clarke, president of General Motors NA, recognizes and understands that there's an awareness issue with its Saturn brand. Despite having the freshest lineup in the business, GM has found that most folks who are in the market for a new car don't realize Saturn has completely overhauled its entire lineup. "In GM research of coastal markets," Automotive News writes, "consumers who saw pictures of Saturn vehicles could not identify them."

As a result, the trade magazine says that Saturn will "revamp" its marketing strategy in an attempt to increase visibility of the brand. "If you look at the purchase funnel, you ask, 'Do we have a consideration problem on Saturn or a conversion problem?'" Clarke told Automotive News. "The fact of the matter is we have a basic awareness problem."

He said that Saturn will continue to promote itself via social media outlets, but that the brand will also "emphasize traditional mass media."

So how much is General Motors willing to spend to get the word out about the new and improved Saturn? Clarke didn't reveal a specific number, but he did say it would be "just as if you're introducing a new brand. We'll probably spend about the same amount of money, but we'll repurpose it so that it's more focused on awareness than consideration."

Source: Automotive News

Random Article from the SaturnFans.com Archives

Flashback Friday: How Saturn Built a Brand

Saturn Logo

Saturn launched its lineup of compact sedans and coupes in the fall of 1990 as an relatively unknown and untested manufacturer of "a different kind of car." The Saturn team did the impossible by implementing a set of strategies that included building quality vehicles and crafting an intriguing message that attracted car buyers who had written off domestic cars long ago. That was no small feat. In his book, "Building Strong Brands," author David Aaker set out to "not only to describe what was done but also to suggest the logic behind the strategies: why they were pursued, and how they were intended to contribute to the brand." He concluded that "although certainly some elements of the Saturn strategy may have been critical, it was the synergy of the total program rather than the power of any single element - that led to its success."