2009 Saturn Vue Review

2008 Saturn Vue XR

Bengt Halvorson from the Car Connection: The Vue has an exterior design that's quite sporty and athletic, with prominent side gill vents and dual stainless steel exhaust tips in uplevel trims. Inside, the 2009 Saturn Vue offers comfortable seating for five with ample legroom, whereas its competitors often have small third-row seats. Front-seat design, however, could use more support. Typical for models in this class, the Vue's rear seats handily fold flat for a moderate expansion of cargo space. It should be mentioned that the Vue's cabin allows minimal road or wind noise to enter, making it one of the quietest interiors in its class. The steering of the 2009 Saturn Vue feels crisp and precise, and the ride is firm but absorbent enough for most bumps. Also, there's very little body lean in corners—confidence-inspiring in a tall vehicle—thanks to stabilizer bars in front and back. The four-cylinder model uses an electric power steering system that feels rather numb and doesn't transmit the road feel or confidence of the hydraulic power steering included with the V-6s, although the V-6 models have some torque steer—a pull to the side with hard acceleration, especially coming out of a tight corner.

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Mysterious Ohio Based Investment Group Arises as a Potential Buyer

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Update on May 7th: Leading negotiations for this group is Gary Marvicsin. Detroit News reports that he is employed in the auto industry.

Detroit News reports that there is a mysterious Ohio based investment group interested in acquiring Saturn. Unlike the other interested buyers, this group has developed a concept to keep the company domestically based. According to the article, the group is interested in purchasing domestically abandoned manufacturing plants to produce Saturns. Chrysler plants that are targeted to close due to bankruptcy troubles were specifically mentioned. The group wants to continue to employee UAW workers at these plants. While recognizing the high costs associated with employing union workers, such as benefits and pensions, the group believes that it is the right move for two reasons.