Some 2006-07 Saturn Ions Recalled

2006 Saturn Ion

General Motors is recalling certain model year 2006 Saturn Ion vehicles originally sold in or currently registered in the states of Arizon and Nevada. Model year 2007 Ions originally sold or currently registered in the states of Arizona, California, Florida, Nevada, and Texas are also impacted by the campaign.

The issue is in regards to the plastic supply or return port on the modular reservoir assembly that may crack. If either of these ports develops a crack, fuel will leak from the area. If the crack becomes large enough, fuel may be observed dripping onto the ground and vehicle performance may be affected. Fuel leakage, in the presence of an ignition source, could result in a fire.

Retailers will replace the fuel pump module free of charge. Special coverage will be implemented in the same time frame for model year 2006 vehicles registered in Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas. Model year 2007 vehicles registered in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Hawaii, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Tennesse will also be repaired.

General Motors has not yet provided an owner notification schedule. Owners may contact Saturn at 1-800-972-8876. Reference GM recall number 090226. Nearly 53,000 Saturn, Chevrolet, and Pontiac vehicles are impacted by this campaign.

Source: NHTSA

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