Owner Story: Good Cars that Will Last for a Long Time

I'm on my second Saturn now. My first one was a 1997 Dark Green SL2 four-door sedan. It wasn't in the best condition when I bought it (from CarMax) in December 2003 with 83,000 miles on the odometer, but I liked it and decided to put performance brake pads, rotors, and plug wires on it. The SL2 worked alright until it reached about 98,000 miles when a rod bearing in the lower part of the engine blew. Still owing $8k on the car, I was out $2k more for a new engine, yet I still loved my Saturn. After that, everything was fine, with only minor replacements of various other parts.

Fast-forward to September '05, my manual transmission went out, and I finally had to say goodbye to my SL2. The only conclusion that I came to was that the previous owner didn't take care of it or abused it severely. Whatever the case, I still loved that car. Even though I had put a total of $6,000 worth of work into it, and paid $7500 for it, it was worth it. Until the transmission went, it was in much better condition than when I bought it.

After working with Saturn of Bel Air, I purchased a 2005 Ion Quad Coupe 2 -- which I also love. My family and friends can't understand why I love Saturns. I know they are good cars that will last for a long time, especially if they are taken care of properly. I know that if I take care of it, it will take care of me. Thank you Saturn for developing good cars.

Source: Errol

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